Things You Should Address in A Fall Protection Plan

In many industrial settings it is important to have a fall protection plan.  These plans are intended, of course, to reduce risks associated with the elevated risks of certain types of work spaces.  A detailed Nouvellehauteur.com protection plan, then, is quite necessary for ensuring the utmost degree of safety in the work place, for everyone.  

Here are 8 things you should address in your organization’s fall protection plan:

#1:  ASSESS [POTENTIAL] FALL HAZARDS

Probably the best way to plan for potential falls is to first attempt to detect such potential falls.  For this, you need to identify all existing fall hazards and then try to estimate the potential fall hazards.  The 5 fall hazards you should look for are:

  • Holes
  • Skylights
  • Platforms
  • Sharp edges
  • Debris

#2:  FALL PROTECTION APPLICATIONS and EQUIPMENT

Essentially, fall protection applications employees could be working in definitely include:

  • Fall arrest
  • Fall restraint
  • Work positioning
  • Rescue space
  • Confined space

Potential fall protection equipment could include:

  • Harnesses (sit, chest, full-body)
  • Lanyards
  • Horizontal lifelines
  • Self-retracting lifelines
  • Ascenders
  • Guardrails
  • Anchorage connectors

#3:  ADHERE TO ASSEMBLY, MAINTENANCE, INSPECTION, and DISASSEMBLY PROTOCOL

To maximize safety it is important to follow all appropriate assembly and disassembly for all equipment you will use.  This protocol involves, of course, inspecting all equipment to ensure it will not malfunction, with the end user of each tool or piece of equipment inspecting them at intervals of no more than one year. Many manufacturers recommend more frequent inspection.

#4:  FOLLOW CORRECT HANDLING, STORAGE, and SECURING PROCEDURES

Every organization should have a plan which ensures their fall protection equipment is properly handled and secured.  If this equipment is not secured and handled properly—at all times—it can become contaminated or damaged in some way which can jeopardize its ability to properly maintain safety.  Such contamination can include:

  • Corrosion
  • Deformation
  • Discoloration
  • Rust

#5:  EMPLOY PROPER EMPLOYEE SAFETY PROTOCOL TRAINING

All new and current employees should receive proper instruction on proper fall protection devices prior to starting their tenure.

#6:  HAVE A “RESCUE PLAN”

It is also very important to have a rescue plan in place should an employee find themselves victim of a fall.  This could include protocols for the victim to be able to handle their own issues or for other workers to provide assistance.

#7:  JOBSITE SPECIFICITY

It is important that each fall protection plan addresses issues which are specific to each job site.

#8:  EMPLOYEE INCLUSION

Finally, a fall protection plan should be available to all employees on the jobsite.